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Help Needed Please


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About 3 months ago we changed the tank and replaced the gravel in my 3x2ft tank. The filter remained the same, the rocks were the same. After about a week I started losing 1 fish at a time, they would stop eating and die. I tested all the water parameters, no ammonia or nitrite and about 10 nitrate.

The fish even though dead looked perfect, no marks, no bloating, nothing odd.

There are also 3 bristlenose in this tank. I feed with new life spectrum.

The only odd thing has been an occaisional white/clear stringy poo.

I have treated the tank with Pimafix, no difference.

I have 4 cichlids (3 salousi and 1 maingano ) left and the 3 bristlenose.

Lost way over 20 fish and another only 3 days ago.

The remaining maingano is now hiding and not eating.

I have no idea what to do .

In desperation yesterday I bought some levamisole. I am willing to try anything at this stage, but from what I have read this only paralises the worms and u must vaccuum them out.

How do you do this in a rock covered tank?

Any help would be appreciated, I can't add more fish as I am sure whatever was in the gravel (well washed) or on the glass (also well washed) may still be effecting the tank :(

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Although you mention no bloat, i'm going to say it sounds like widespread malawi bloat to me (which is just symptoms not an actual disease). Stop eating, white poo, hiding are symptoms that the fish is unwell and cannot take in food. The actual disease could be anything from bacterial infection of the disgestive system, to organ failure, to parasites, etc etc...

My first try would be metronidazole, and then probably clout.

Metronidazole is an anti-biotic which should take care of bacterial infection and certain parasite problems. Clout is somewhat toxic stuff which will take care of parasites if any. (i think clout works for bacterial infection too), so just get hold of either one, i think it is your best bet.

You cannot buy these off the shelf, but you can look around this forum or plecofanatics forum for others who will sell some to you through postage.

If it is v. urgent, then get them to express post it.

Edited by kcfongie
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What size filter is on the tank and how long has the new tank been running?

Are the fish eating?

Treating anything when you dont know what the problem is, is a waste of time and money.

Josh

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The only thing new is the gravel :confused: is it not. What was it, did you clean it before adding or?

when you replaced your gravel did you also clean your filter?????

i think your tank maybe going through a mini cycle whats your parameters????

it is running an eheim 2217, the filter was not cleaned when we changed the tank(new tank) and put in new gravel. This has been going on for 3 months now. As I said in my first post all water tests show no kind of cycle happening.

The bristlenose are still eating as are the 3 remaining salousi, the maingano is not.

We changed from a dark to light gravel. As I say no obvious outward signs on the fish. The local LFS is as confused as I am. I do not want to randomly add medications that will kill the filter bacteria but the Levamisole apparently won't harm it.

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seriously, you never really know what happen when your fish stop eating.

You cannot be sure.

2 most recommended for mbuna who stops eating is metronidazole or Clout.

Metronidazole i know for sure will not affect your filter bacteria and will not affect reproductive system of your fish. Coz i used it b4.

Sometimes bacteria outbreak happens, you can't always identify what causes it.

Maybe stress when you changed the gravel... etc etc....

Exactly what gravel did you change to?

- material (argonite, marble, coral, sand, etc...)

- size (0.3mm, 1mm, 1cm...)

- roughness

- used or new?

And HOW exactly did you make the gravel change?

- did you remove all your fish to a separate tank

- was the other tank water cycled.

- was the temperature under control

- ... just tell the whole process.

BUT in the end, you just need to treat it. If it was my tank, i'll dump in metronidazole. I won't care about the cost, its cheap compared to your fished, and it doesn't harm fish or bacteria.

Why metronidazole,.. because its a tried and tested antibiotic which worked for mbuna who stops eating. It works on both bacteria and many parasites. So it covers a large range of stuff.

Edited by kcfongie
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seriously, you never really know what happen when your fish stop eating.

You cannot be sure.

2 most recommended for mbuna who stops eating is metronidazole or Clout.

Metronidazole i know for sure will not affect your filter bacteria and will not affect reproductive system of your fish. Coz i used it b4.

Sometimes bacteria outbreak happens, you can't always identify what causes it.

Maybe stress when you changed the gravel... etc etc....

Exactly what gravel did you change to?

- material (argonite, marble, coral, sand, etc...)

- size (0.3mm, 1mm, 1cm...)

- roughness

- used or new?

And HOW exactly did you make the gravel change?

- did you remove all your fish to a separate tank

- was the other tank water cycled.

- was the temperature under control

- ... just tell the whole process.

BUT in the end, you just need to treat it. If it was my tank, i'll dump in metronidazole. I won't care about the cost, its cheap compared to your fished, and it doesn't harm fish or bacteria.

Why metronidazole,.. because its a tried and tested antibiotic which worked for mbuna who stops eating. It works on both bacteria and many parasites. So it covers a large range of stuff.

[/quoteThe fish were moved to a fish tub, it was normal 2mm gravel (new, and washed)? with small seashells to buffer it, we used 90% of the old water basically apart from the gravel and the new glass, everything was the same.

I can't get those other meds here and i can't see how treating with the levamisole will hurt :(

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seriously, you never really know what happen when your fish stop eating.

You cannot be sure.

2 most recommended for mbuna who stops eating is metronidazole or Clout.

Metronidazole i know for sure will not affect your filter bacteria and will not affect reproductive system of your fish. Coz i used it b4.

Sometimes bacteria outbreak happens, you can't always identify what causes it.

Maybe stress when you changed the gravel... etc etc....

Exactly what gravel did you change to?

- material (argonite, marble, coral, sand, etc...)

- size (0.3mm, 1mm, 1cm...)

- roughness

- used or new?

And HOW exactly did you make the gravel change?

- did you remove all your fish to a separate tank

- was the other tank water cycled.

- was the temperature under control

- ... just tell the whole process.

BUT in the end, you just need to treat it. If it was my tank, i'll dump in metronidazole. I won't care about the cost, its cheap compared to your fished, and it doesn't harm fish or bacteria.

Why metronidazole,.. because its a tried and tested antibiotic which worked for mbuna who stops eating. It works on both bacteria and many parasites. So it covers a large range of stuff.

I answere dthis dunno where it went, reg 2mm gravel, all same water replaced--------------- nothing different except gravel and new glass tank same size

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:confused: Put meds needed in Google? You can buy over the net. You should have done this long ago to save your fish. Even a multi cure would have helped, surely your pet shop had some advice?.You dont answer how you added the new gravel ? Was it pre washed from shop or did you do it yourself and how would help.
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stringy white poo = treat with Metronidazole

get a script your family doctor or a vet or try a

chemist and explain you will be treating your fish

Metro is not an antibiotic

any Tropheus keeper will tell you that the first sign of

flagellated protozoa is stringy white poo then the fin

clamping and the heavy breathing at the bottom of the

tank usually in a corner

Levermisole is good but for worms and then it should

be use with Praziquantal (Droncit wormer)

click here for more info Levermisole

do a search for dosage rates

Chris

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stringy white poo = treat with Metronidazole

get a script your family doctor or a vet or try a

chemist and explain you will be treating your fish

Metro is not an antibiotic

any Tropheus keeper will tell you that the first sign of

flagellated protozoa is stringy white poo then the fin

clamping and the heavy breathing at the bottom of the

tank usually in a corner

Levermisole is good but for worms and then it should

be use with Praziquantal (Droncit wormer)

click here for more info Levermisole

do a search for dosage rates

Chris

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stringy white poo = treat with Metronidazole

get a script your family doctor or a vet or try a

chemist and explain you will be treating your fish

Metro is not an antibiotic

any Tropheus keeper will tell you that the first sign of

flagellated protozoa is stringy white poo then the fin

clamping and the heavy breathing at the bottom of the

tank usually in a corner

Levermisole is good but for worms and then it should

be use with Praziquantal (Droncit wormer)

click here for more info Levermisole

do a search for dosage rates

Chris

Treated with Levermisole will x my fingers, this has been 3 months and after treating today saw at least 1 of the bristlenose has the clear/ white poop too. I can;t get the meds, I am in a small inland town now, was ok when i lived near brissy :(

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Have had the same happen in the last 2 weeks. Noticed an increased smell in chemical smell in water from the the tap water at the same time. A lot more rain, conspiracy theory, water authority has introduced other or greater chemicals that cannot be treated with our treatments. No marks, evidence of fungi, just dead fish or fish wasting away to nothing.

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Is it a brand new tank? I have known cases where aquariums were built using the wrong silicone and fish were dieing due to leaching chemicals from the silicone. Clutching at straws i know, but is just a thaught.

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:confused: I just cant believe your replies.

You have INTERNET so you can have sent to you anything you wish to buy over the net.So dont say you cant get them.But you now say you have treated with Levermisole? :clap At least what fish you have left may live.

When you have a problem lkie this you need to act that day.

Add up the cost of the fish you have lost !!!!!

To leave it 3 months to do something says??????

Good point Ant?

So now you have it down to , New tank or new gravel or maybe the water added????

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stringy white poo = treat with Metronidazole

get a script your family doctor or a vet or try a

chemist and explain you will be treating your fish

Metro is not an antibiotic

any Tropheus keeper will tell you that the first sign of

flagellated protozoa is stringy white poo then the fin

clamping and the heavy breathing at the bottom of the

tank usually in a corner

Levermisole is good but for worms and then it should

be use with Praziquantal (Droncit wormer)

click here for more info Levermisole

do a search for dosage rates

Chris

Chris and kcfongie are on the money, and metro, available from vets, would probably have sorted out the problem.

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Not sure where you are coming from saying that metro is not an antibiotic. I just did a quick search on

wikipedia which states "Metronidazole is an antibiotic, amebicide, and antiprotozoal."

This confirmed my thoughts anyways as I have been prescribed this medication alongside a list of other

antibiotics to work together in effect (made me think about trying the others on the fish too :) )

Other than that Chris I can't find wrong with what you are saying, which is always a great help :thumbup:

Cheers,

John

stringy white poo = treat with Metronidazole

get a script your family doctor or a vet or try a

chemist and explain you will be treating your fish

Metro is not an antibiotic

any Tropheus keeper will tell you that the first sign of

flagellated protozoa is stringy white poo then the fin

clamping and the heavy breathing at the bottom of the

tank usually in a corner

Levermisole is good but for worms and then it should

be use with Praziquantal (Droncit wormer)

click here for more info Levermisole

do a search for dosage rates

Chris

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googled and found this :lol3:

GENERIC NAME: metronidazole

BRAND NAME: Flagyl

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Metronidazole is an antibiotic effective against anaerobic bacteria and certain parasites. Anaerobic bacteria are single-celled, living organisms that thrive in environments in which there is little oxygen (anaerobic environments) and can cause disease in the abdomen (bacterial peritonitis), liver (liver abscess), and pelvis (abscess of the ovaries and the Fallopian tubes). Giardia lamblia and ameba are intestinal parasites that can cause abdominal pain and diarrhea in infected individuals. Trichomonas is a vaginal parasite that causes inflammation of the vagina (vaginitis). Metronidazole selectively blocks some of the functions within the bacterial cells and the parasites resulting in their death.

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 250 and 500 mg. Tablets, extended release: 750 mg. Capsule: 375 mg. Cream: 0.75% and 1%. Lotion: 0.75%. Gel: 0.75% and 1%. Injection: 5 mg/ml

STORAGE: Metronidazole should be stored at room temperature and protected from light.

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chemist and explain you will be treating your fish

Metro is not an antibiotic

Won't get any sympathy from a chemist unless you have a script from either a vet or a Dr.

It is an antibiotic. See Link2Hells googling efforts above.

Another one used in the aquarium industry is Tetracycline, although, as yet, I haven't seen it recommended for any fish diseases (on this forum anyway).

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