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My Current project 8x2.5x2.5


Stuart86
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I have a 8x2.5x2.5 that I scored when clearing out a aquarium. I plan to house Tanganyikans. The aqua-scape will be similar to CThompsons 10 foot (very inspirational tank), but i plan to a 3D rock background as well to hide the weirs.

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My very shocked mum

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I accidently cracked the base as i was first attempting to drill the inlet hole :shock: as i didnt know that you had to drill from both sides of the glass. So as you can see there is a cover sheet of Glass which is 12mm thick and runs half the length of the tank and full width,then resealed all edges. :thumb

I'm up to installing the 2 weirs in both back corners as I finally finished drilling the inlet and outlet holes last night.

I plan to use my 5 foot display tank (very badly scratched) as the sump and have it double ended as there is 2 weirs in either end of the tank.

Will post more pics once i progress a bit more.

Stu

Edited by Stuart86
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Cheers mate its very exciting, i cant wait to fill it up! although at the same time i will be very nervous with the crack :( , even tho the repair job should be more than strong enough. Ill just stand as far away as possible while filling :lol1:

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I just lost my beloved 6x2x2 a couple of days ago, was a $1k setup and because it cracked, got rid of it for $300 couldnt bare to look at it anymore..

Best of luck though, im sure you would have done a tough job. cant wait for more pictures!

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I just lost my beloved 6x2x2 a couple of days ago, was a $1k setup and because it cracked, got rid of it for $300 couldnt bare to look at it anymore..

Best of luck though, im sure you would have done a tough job. cant wait for more pictures!

Did it crack while it was full?

Stu

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Stu that sucks when you crack the glass after all the care you take getting it home :B

keep the thread running as everyone will be watching for updates :yes:

so long as there is good thick foam under it and all is level so no torsional

force is exerted the patch should be OK but what are you doing with the holes

drilling the patch to match or just covering them

is it a one or two piece base ?

Chris

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I just lost my beloved 6x2x2 a couple of days ago, was a $1k setup and because it cracked, got rid of it for $300 couldnt bare to look at it anymore..

Best of luck though, im sure you would have done a tough job. cant wait for more pictures!

Did it crack while it was full?

Stu

Yes and it was nearly full to the top so you could imagine approx 600L covering the surface of my bedroom, and all my fish were in there (thank god i hadn't left to work yet).

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Stu that sucks when you crack the glass after all the care you take getting it home :B

keep the thread running as everyone will be watching for updates :yes:

so long as there is good thick foam under it and all is level so no torsional

force is exerted the patch should be OK but what are you doing with the holes

drilling the patch to match or just covering them

is it a one or two piece base ?

Chris

Well the hole which is covered is now in the wrong position as I decided to reduce the size of the weirs, in order to gain more tank space.

It is a one piece base.. Which means I have to ensure the stand is perfectly flat and level. I bought 19 mm foam for the tank to sit on, do you think that will be thick enough.?

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have you refilled that tank to test out the repair job? The photo doesn't really show the detail regarding this repair, but basically you have to be absolutely POSITIVE that not only will it hold its water when first set up, that it will do so in ten + years time. You simply can't have a tank of this size (or any size) leak.

Imagine your mum's face should she have 2000 litres of water flooding through her house.

In your position I'd be more inclined to cut the base off, and put a new piece in. It will be an easy job to do once the glass is cut (measure existing size) and correctly positioned.

For a side point, tank bottoms are best made from more than one piece, as it gives a bit of flexibility, so if you took off the old piece, cut it straight and buy the extra piece required for the part you discard, then put a cover piece across the join, you will have a tank better than before you broke it. Both my big tanks were made this way at my request. Call Wayne for the glass, he has always been very congenial for such fiddly bits. I would have used him to drill the holes as well, the extra costs for his services are well paid for by his experience.

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have you refilled that tank to test out the repair job? The photo doesn't really show the detail regarding this repair, but basically you have to be absolutely POSITIVE that not only will it hold its water when first set up, that it will do so in ten + years time. You simply can't have a tank of this size (or any size) leak.

Imagine your mum's face should she have 2000 litres of water flooding through her house.

In your position I'd be more inclined to cut the base off, and put a new piece in. It will be an easy job to do once the glass is cut (measure existing size) and correctly positioned.

For a side point, tank bottoms are best made from more than one piece, as it gives a bit of flexibility, so if you took off the old piece, cut it straight and buy the extra piece required for the part you discard, then put a cover piece across the join, you will have a tank better than before you broke it. Both my big tanks were made this way at my request. Call Wayne for the glass, he has always been very congenial for such fiddly bits. I would have used him to drill the holes as well, the extra costs for his services are well paid for by his experience.

The thought of replacing the whole base did come into consideration but this was recommended by a few different glaziers, so trusting their experience with glass i did it their way :dntknw:. I will take more photos showing detail to the repair... Hopefully its strong enough, I completely sealed the cover panel to the base with zig zag lines of silicone and every edge is sealed, IMO i think it would be stronger now than it was with just the single base panel. I could be terribly wrong tho.?

Well one good point will be that the tank will be going in the garage on the opposite wall to the rack. So any freak accident will not be much worry. Except for my destroyed tank...

I will be doing a test fill once the weirs are in place and the silicone has cured.

Drilling is a lot easier now I know to drill from both sides. But i would pay for someone else to do it for sure next time. Its such a slow scary process, well scary for me anyhow.

Who is Wayne btw?

Thanks

Stu

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I bought 2 lengths of 10mm glass tubing yesterday which i plan to silicone into the corners at each end to neatly run the airline down under the substrate.

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Im unsure of what substrate to use so im open for suggestions? i want to make this as natural and as close to wild like conditions as possible. I was thinking of using sydney sand or beach sand? Any thoughts on what would be best suited?

Stu

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I'd suggest 4 glass rods, one in each corner including the front.

Who is Wayne btw?

Tank maker.

Its such a slow scary process, well scary for me anyhow.

:yes::yes::yes:

The thought of replacing the whole base did come into consideration but this was recommended by a few different glaziers

I'd take advice from a tank maker myself, but would still probably replace the bottom. Once the glass was cleaned, siliconeing would be easy. Thinking about it though, with the extra piece glued in will make it hard if not impossible (short of a hammer) to get the old piece out now. It will affect the resale ability should you eventually sell.

I trust you are using bulk head fittings on the drilled holes.

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Yeah I have drilled 40 mm holes for both inlet and outlet, and will be using 32 mm bulkhead for the outlet and 25 mm for the inlet. I drilled them as big as possible as you said Craig just incase I need to increase a bulkhead size later..

Stu

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Yeah I have drilled 40 mm holes for both inlet and outlet, and will be using 32 mm bulkhead for the outlet and 25 mm for the inlet. I drilled them as big as possible as you said Craig just incase I need to increase a bulkhead size later..

Stu

The advice was drill a larger sized hole than the minimum size required, and to use the appropriate sized bulk head for the hole drilled (the biggest size that will fit). Then to use plumbing fitted to the bulkheads to plumb down to match pump's sizes. That is, use the biggest sized bulkhead that will fit the40 mm holes drilled, and use reducing plumbing fitted to the bulk head fitting on either side to match what the pump size is.

In this way, should you upsize the pump, it is a simple matter to cap the inside bulkhead outlet, remove and increase the plumbing attachments that were reducing the plumbing size on the bottom, outside the tank, put on new and bigger pump, then do the same for inside tank bulkhead fittings.

To be clearer; NOW is the time to put the bigger bulkheads on, not after the tank is full should you decide to use a bigger pump with bigger inlet and outlets sizes.

Edited by CThompson
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Enjoying this thread Stu, nice to see all the hard work paying off and photo's of it all coming together.

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Yeah I have drilled 40 mm holes for both inlet and outlet, and will be using 32 mm bulkhead for the outlet and 25 mm for the inlet. I drilled them as big as possible as you said Craig just incase I need to increase a bulkhead size later..

Stu

The advice was drill a larger sized hole than the minimum size required, and to use the appropriate sized bulk head for the hole drilled (the biggest size that will fit). Then to use plumbing fitted to the bulkheads to plumb down to match pump's sizes. That is, use the biggest sized bulkhead that will fit the40 mm holes drilled, and use reducing plumbing fitted to the bulk head fitting on either side to match what the pump size is.

In this way, should you upsize the pump, it is a simple matter to cap the inside bulkhead outlet, remove and increase the plumbing attachments that were reducing the plumbing size on the bottom, outside the tank, put on new and bigger pump, then do the same for inside tank bulkhead fittings.

To be clearer; NOW is the time to put the bigger bulkheads on, not after the tank is full should you decide to use a bigger pump with bigger inlet and outlets sizes.

Great advice :thumbup:

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