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Requiring a Education ..


Bedge
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Hello,

So I am picking up a second hand tank tomorrow and it has a Eheim filter 2213.

I have never used this type of equipment and would like to know what it does and how it works.

:thumbup:

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Hello,

So I am picking up a second hand tank tomorrow and it has a Eheim filter 2213.

I have never used this type of equipment and would like to know what it does and how it works.

:thumbup:

eheim 3312 is a cannister filter....they are great units...basically it sits outside of the tank, one hose in and one hose out with water going through filter media in between.

i believe they are a superior cannister as ALL water goes through the medium before entering back into your tank.....

as for trouble shooting...make sure there is no air inside the cannister, make sure the seal is on properly if it is an older model, if you cant get the motor off for some reason open up one of the taps as it can create a vacuum...:). if its in decent condition you wont be disappointed with it.

if you have any other questions post here, im sure alot of members have ALOT of experience with the eheim classic range.

HTH

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its definitely a great quality product, whether it is suited to your application will depend on your tank size. but quality wise they are second to none. their rated for tanks up to 250L personally depending on stocking levels i think 100-150L is more conservative.

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I've got a 2215 and a 2217 (under)filtering my tank. Been running for months and haven't needed to clean either yet, great products.

Before starting it be sure the unit is full of water by starting a siphon from the intake, closing off the tap, then plugging it in and opening it back up (make sure the other ends closed at this point). Water should then start flowing out of your spraybar close to straight away once it's plugged in. If it's being incredibly noisy and not pumping water theres something wrong with the siphon at the other end ;)

Upon starting properly with water flowing out of the spraybar, it will be slightly noisy due to air in the piping or canister somewhere. Tilting the canister in circular motions will usually alleviate this or you can let it sort itself out.

Eheim Classics are very low maintenance and great value for money so hopefully their reputation reflects how it works for you ;)

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Simple search on the web:

External/Canister Filters

Compared to filters that hang on the back of the aquarium, canister-style external filters offer a greater quantity of filter materials to be used along with a greater degree of flexibility with respect to filter material choice.Water enters the canister filled with the chosen filter material through an intake pipe at the bottom of the canister, passes through the material, and is pumped back to the aquarium through an electric pump on the top of the canister.A major benefit of this type of filter is that it can be disconnected from the tank for cleaning/maintenance and replaced without disturbing the aquarium.

And another one:

A canister filter is a large, powerful aquarium filter used for mechanical, biological and optionally, chemical filtration. Canister filters sit below the tank, usually inside of the aquarium stand. They are closed cylinders that stand about 15" (38 cm) high, with locking lids. The lids have intake and outtake valves that connect to tubing, which feeds up into the tank. The intake tube draws water into the filter where it follows a circuitous path through various filter mediums before being expelled at the outtake valve to return to the tank.

Canister filters are extremely robust. Unlike hang on tank filters, canister filters can normally go several months without maintenance of any kind.

The interior of a canister filter varies depending on manufacturer and model. However all perform the same basic functions. Water enters the filter through the lid which holds a magnetic impeller motor. The water passes through large foam pads designed to trap particulate matter. It then follows a route through a series of chambers filled with various filter media that purifies the water to greater degrees at each step. Finally the water passes through media designed to harbor bacterial colonies that make up the biological filter. Now the purified water is ready to return to the tank. At the surface of the tank where the outflow tube is located, a flange is supplied to direct the current. Alternately a spray bar can be attached.

Maintenance on a canister filter is a snap. The entire process takes about 15 minutes and normally only needs to be done 1-3 times a year. Because canister filters require so little maintenance, chemical filtration is often relegated to a hang on tank filter instead. That way, the carbon or specialty resins that comprise the chemical filtration can be easily changed out as often as needed, simply by reaching into the hang on filter, rather than disturbing the canister.

Canister filters come in different sizes with corresponding flow rates. Though a canister filter is overkill for a 10 gallon (38 liters) tank, a modest canister filter on a 20 - 30 gallon (75 - 113 liters) tank would be fine, though depending on the type of fish kept, you may want to deflect the current or utilize a spray bar. And of course canister filters are an excellent choice for medium to large tanks, unless a sump is desired. In that case a wet/dry filter would be utilized, making a canister filter unnecessary.

For all of their power, canister filters are virtually silent and use very little electricity. The magnetic impeller motors, also used in hang on tank filters and powerheads, are extremely reliable and can last for well over a decade. No matter what your filtering needs, short of a very small aquarium, a canister filter is sure to be one of the best investments you can make in this highly rewarding hobby.

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Oh right! Thank you ...

So do you need a over hang filter to get the carbon in? Are there other ways of getting carbon in to the tank? Carbon is important, isn't it?

Carbon is useful for removing impurities and after treating the tank with medications but for the day to day running of your tank it isn't necessary. I usually run carbon for a few weeks after setting up a new tank and then I throw it away...

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