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Watch this! Very interesting


jrod
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Interesting vid, I rarely think on what studies are going on with the fish I keep and in the back of my mind I always consider it to be "older" studies with no new ones. Just a perception thing I know but good to see they are continuing.

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I thought it was fascinating that they are always finding new cool species. I think she also put the hybridization in the lake debate to bed.

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  • 3 weeks later...

she handled that specimen without gloves!

I noticed that she is single and hot!

agreed, very interesting and yup agreed, she is hot - love that accent ;)

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Interesting....

I think the comment about species hybridizing in the Lake because of turbidity is a bit silly at best.....

Species have been hybridizing long before any deforestation!

Incorrect.

Hybridisation is becoming so frequent in some locations because of the lack of visual cues, that some species are losing their unique characteristics so that the "original" species involved are no-longer distiguishable from each other. This is well documented amongst the Lake Victoria Basin fish. Now it is a concern for Lake T & M too.

Previously hybridisation would be a rare occurance, where the hybrid would generally be less fit to breed (not accepted as a partner by the opposite sex). And only hybridisation events which increase fitness would be part of the evolutionary process.

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Perhaps....you are incorrect

Sure this refers to shelldwellers....but it works for other species as well!

http://biosearch.berkeley.edu/index.php?ac...q=pmid:17254340

Abstract

......From the direct observation of hybrids we conclude that hybridization between distantly related gastropod-shell-breeding cichlids of Lake Tanganyika follows inevitably from their ecological specialization. Moreover, the observed incongruence between mtDNA and nuclear multilocus phylogeny suggests that repeated hybridization events among quite distantly related taxa affected the diversification of this group, and introduced reticulation into their phylogeny.....

There is a lot of scientific study that shows hybridization has been going on since the lakes formed.....it's NOT something NEW!

Hybridization IS going on in the lakes....IN CLEAR WATER

Goggle hybrids and you will get photo's of different species breeding..."IN THE WILD"

Edited by Rod54
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Of course it occurs. But the point is that it is now occuring at such a rate that species are being lost. The turbidity of the water prevents mate recognition and a significant increase in hybridisation to the ponit of loss of the caracteristics that define the species or race with in the species. Human activity does impact on the wild populations of cichlids.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080...rnalCode=uaem20

"Turbidity prevented the species-specific sexual signalling

system from working in Lake Victoria cichlids, resulting in

hybdridization (Seehausen et al. 1997; Seehausen & van

Alphen 1998)."

from this paper: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1691863/pdf/15556888.pdf

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/277/5333/1808.abstract

I have this last paper in PDF in anyone wants it.

http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=ca...CIGk02FZN2UNkow

This one shows that low visibility has allowed C afra introduced at thumbi west to hybridise with M. zebra at this location. Read the conclusion.

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And in the paper you quoted it stated " ...suggests that repeated hybridization events among quite distantly related taxa affected the diversification of this group, and introduced reticulation into their phylogeny"

In otherwords, hybridisation events effect diversity of species. Your article is explaining that even though species were distantly related, their similar breeding behaviours has meant that hybridisation is occuring, a natural process in this instance and that hybridisation is impacting on diversity.

Increasing the number of hybridisation events decreases diversity = loss of species. Turbidity increases hybridisation.

No-one says hybridisation does not occur. The video was explaining the worry about turbidity and human activity increasing the rate of hybridisation until there is a loss of the unique characteristics of the species. And the need to prevent the loss of species through scientific study and conservation efforts.

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Problem isn't a bit of dirt in the water....It's introduced species

like Nile perch eating everything in sight

And....If Humans move variants all over the lake....then just like in Aquariums...off course they will interbreed.....it's a no brainer....regardless of water quality(Bigger zebra males will win!)

Might be quicker in dirty water....but it will still happen in the clear water TOO!

Edited by Rod54
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Over fishing, introduced species, pollution, an the increase of rates of hybridisation are all real and different threats to the survival of species within the Rift Lakes. To say that cutting down trees doesn't impact on Cichlids is nonsense. Sounds like old growth loggers clutching at straws to defend unsustainable practices.

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This is not the first time I have heard of this statement about hybridization due to Turbidity. I guess they do this research for a reason so I somewhat trust their judgement.

When I said "she put the hybridization debate to bed" it was a statement towards some people who believe hybrids do not occur in the wild.

As for her "hotness", not my type but I can see where you are comming from. I do like the accent though.

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Konings shows a hybrid red top zebra in the lake in 4th Edn. The hybrid debate is all about if cultured hybrids diminish the number of natural species being kept and the integrity of named species in the hobby.

Hybridisation is threatening species in the wild, I suspect it is in fish tanks too.

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maybe one day all the species will mix until there's only 1 species(exactly like their common ancestor) in the lake, then the evolution of different species will start all over again, but this time they will evolve to tell each other apart in murky water

Edited by joller
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