Jump to content

joining canister filters


Guest sumthin fishy

Recommended Posts

Guest sumthin fishy

hi all, just have a question concerning canister filters. Is it possible to connect two canister filters together so they both have the same inlet and outlet in the tank? thx in advance.

Carl

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No it isn't a simple yes or no. The reason I pointed to the search feature is that there was quite a detailed discussion on the pros and cons of the idea recently if I remember correctly.

Why should I have to search for the thread or rehash the info if it is not me who wants it? I think I did a nice thing in providing a quick response saying if you search for it there is plenty of info available on the forum.

If somebody wants the information and decides to find it, I am sure they will be pleased they did.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

imo id run them seperately then youll have better water movement and if one blocks or breaks down youll still have one going ,the problem i can see runnig them in tandem is that a normally gravity fed filter would be pressure fed i think the filter media in the second filter would get compressed and block in turn burning out the first , id run them seperately , at least youll have no dead spots in the tank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hmmm...I would think that is ya wanted to run them in a "Line Filter" configuration, then one(the initial filter) would have to run as a slave.

This will effectively halve the flow-rate of the 2 filters(and probably the expected flow-rate of the 1 filter B'coz it is drawing water thru much more media) meaning circulation will be effected but the filter should still operate effectively for Biological-Filtration.

Another option, and probably quite a bit cheaper, might be to use "Preasure tested Pond Filters" in conjunction with a Large water pump. You can link the pressure-cells together and then attach the pump at the end as a water-return.

HTH

p.s. anyone having a "Go" at Ducky needs to pull their head-in...people don't use the Search feature enough IMO, & getting a fast response is better than no response.

Go Duck!! thumb.gifwoot.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will depend a bit too I think on how you intend to pack the filters. For example, if the first filter is intended to be filled with a very course media and the second a finer one I don't see a problem with this. Or for example if you pack the first one out with the appropriate different mechanical medias, from course to fine, and the second filter could be completely biological, would work for me too.

Don't lifeguard sell a canister (tube like) style filter with much the same sort of principle (with one pump only though)?

Not an expert on how two separate filters with two separate pumps would react to the final outflow. However, I know you can plumb two pumps together train like, but the difference with you would be the water passing through the filters themselves will create an "X" factor.

At some stage, you will have one filter blocking a bit, and having its flow increased or decreased from being in tandem, but when there is only one filter, its flow will also be affected by how clean/dirty it is, so pumps are designed to not run at optimum at all times.

I think the key to your success here will be how you pack each filter. I would go with a mechanical style in the first one, and a loosly (i.e. not tight) packed bio in the second.

Craig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've only ever seen this done when one filter breaks down and isn't worth repairing the motor.

Tim used to do it, and he had one good filter with one which didn't work, so the good one was pushing the water through the bad one.

This gave him the same flow rate as the good filter, but he had an increased amount of media.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...