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make your own melafix


midnightexpress

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I have been experimenting to replace melafix.what I did was

-1- I got 20ml of pure tea tree oil

-2- get a 500ml container

-3- put the tea tree oil in the container along with water so you get a volume of

500ml.

your treatment solution is mixed.

now what I do is before i put this in the tank i shake it a lot then i put 5ml of this

solution to 150 liters of tank water.do this for 7days then do a water change.

the results have been thumb.gif

this will treat 15000 liters of water

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I use a similar recipe myself.

I get an empty Melafix bottle, 480ml.

I add 5ml of Tea Tree Oil, then top up to the top with tap water.

Dosage-wise, I then use it exactly as per the instructions on the side of the Melafix bottle, making sure I shake properly before using.

It works for me, and each bottle of "Melafix" costs me about $1 instead of $20 thumb.gif

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hi Baz

i've done the tea tree oil trick, but it sure does smell a lot different.

the real melafix contains cajapet oil. is this a different oil or just an american name? all you guys have used it, so it must be ok. although i do like the smell of melafix. not sure about the room smelling like a gum forrest though.

cheers;Colin

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Colin mine smells very very similar to melafix when it's mixed, not as strong as pure tea tree oil.

I remember a discussion on these forums a few years back, which is where I got that recipe, and I think Melafix is made from Melaluca trees? (explains the name I guess), and these trees are either the same, or very similar to, tea trees.

By mixing it this way, it's practically the same as the real deal, and all it is missing is some kind of 'binding' agent which is why the bottle needs to be shaken each time it is used.

Disclaimer: I am NOT a scientist and the above ramblings came from a very foggy memory. If anyone can confirm or dispute my theory please do so, so that we can all learn smile.gif

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The "binding" agent would be an oil in water emulsifier. I would really like to know what it is smile.gif . So if anyone does know please feel free to post tongue.gif

cheers

*EDIT* Never mind....found the recipe. If anyone is interested let me know...not sure if i should be posting it on here, ie might take buisness away from page supporters. If its ok i will post it

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Good point..... still can't find the emulsifier though...

Melafix is composed of:

1% cajeput oil

1% emulsifier (Crovol PK-70 nonionic emulsifier)

0.2% defoamer (FG-10 by Dow Corning)

97.8% deionized water"

An aqueous solution without emulsifier and defoamer can be used, but the mixture must be shaken vigorously for 1-5 minutes first.

Note cajeput oil is another name for oil from the tree Melaleuca. From my reading, the patent is based on oil from a vietnamese version of the tree, Melaleuca

cajuputi, M. leucadendron and other species of Melaleuca.

Apparently some of the herbal/health food oil, called "Tea tree oil" is from an australian version of the Melaleuca tree, Melaleuca alternifolia . Haven't heard of any specific differentiation. However, it appears that the term cajeput is used only for the vietnamese oils from M. cajuputi and M. leucadendron. So if you want to be mixing EXACTLY the same stuff, it seems to me you want to find "cajeput" oil, not merely "Tea tree" oil.

Also wondering about the "CAS# 8008-98-8" I found it is a scientific reference which translates to

"Oil of cajeput [8008-98-8] Synonyms: Melaleuca cajuputi powell oil; Melaleuca leucadendron l. oil; Cajuput oil; Oil of cajeput; Cajeput oil"

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The CAS number stands for "Chemical Abstract" something im sure. It is pretty much a collection of all known chemicals. So to find what that chemical looks like, its properties etc etc, u could go to the CAS index and find out all about it. Oh how i luv CAS, just finished my major in chemistry, priceless tool that.

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