MelbBill

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About MelbBill

  • Rank
    Dwarf cichlid (Regular)
  • Birthday 11/05/1950

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  • MSN bill_phillips50@hotmail.com
  • Website URL http://

Profile Information

  • Location Albert Park Victoria
  • Interests Goldfish, killiefish, West African cichlids, angels.<br /><br />Fish pathology<br /><br />Photography

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  1. Where to buy Calcium Chloride?

    It was actually my recipe devised back in th 1970s. The molecular weight of calcium chloride is around 110 while the dihydrate is 146, Therefore to get the same amount of calcium in the water you really need to use one and a third teaspoons of CaCl2.2H2O compared to one teapsoon of CaCl2. Just make certain you never use calcium chlorate which releases chlorine gas.
  2. Salt Recipe

    It was actually my recipe devised back in th 1970s. The molecular weight of calcium chloride is around 110 while the dihydrate is 146, Therefore to get the same amount of calcium in the water you really need to use one and a third teaspoons of CaCl2.2H2O compared to one teapsoon of CaCl2. Just make certain you never use calcium chlorate which releases chlorine gas.
  3. Volume measurement

    Half the diameter of the drum squared times the height times 3.14. So if diameter is 20 cm and the height is 100 cm the volume is: 20/2*20/2*100 *3.14 = 10 * 10 * 100 * 3.14 = 31400 cubic centimetres = 31.4 litres
  4. electric blue jack dempseys

    They were suiccessfully bred bya Melbourne lFS several years ago and distributed round the hobby to dedicated breeders. They are a relatively easy fish to breed.
  5. Apistos - how many and what M:F ratio

    So obviously you are against responsible fish heeping. Community tanks and biotope tanks are not exclusive. Oh well I will not try to convert people who will not listen or heed responsible and proper fish keeping.
  6. Apistos - how many and what M:F ratio

    Thank you for the confirmation of my warning about optimal water conditions. Yes many species of creature are adaptable to less than optimal water conditions. This does not mean that one is using good animal husbandry. I believe in using optimal conditions and optimal matching as far as possible. When you show me rainbows happily co-habitating with Apistogramma in the Amazon basin, I will begin to give credence to your practices.
  7. Apistos - how many and what M:F ratio

    People need to reaqd up on optimal water conditions required for rainbowfish and Apiistogramma. I suggest both the previous two contributors look at what water conditions are best, which isd more than just keeping fish alive.
  8. rocks from rock pools/the beach

    Some shales are oil producing. Soak some of the rock in a bucket of water and if there does not develop an oil film on the top of the water, the rock is perfectly OK to use. The principal problem with rocks is whether they are carbonate rich or not - if they are they will increase the hardness and pH of soft water tanks. As you are looking at a Malawi tank, that is not a problem
  9. rocks from rock pools/the beach

    The more I reserach it the more I believe it is sandstone. Most of the Sydney sandstone is hard enough as you walk or sit on it, but that is because most exposed surfaces are steeped in insoluble ferric iron. Over time, groundwater with organic content can reduce this to soluble forms which seep through the rock to some point where the iron settles and oxidises to an insoluble form once more. In some areas, organic matter trapped in the sandstone has produced concentric shells of insoluble iron as waves of soluble iron have diffused out and then settled back into their oxidised form. Later, when the rock has eroded away, an agate-like appearance shows us where the chemical reaction took place, in some former eon. I have a photo of Sydney sandstone if anyone can tell me how to attach it
  10. rocks from rock pools/the beach

    How soft is the rock? How easily can it be smashed up? Could it be some kind of sandstone/limestone aggregate which is my first guess as you say it contains fossils in it. I see no problems in thoroughly washing it, drying it in the sun and using it for your Malawi tanks. If it leaches a little lime or salt the fish are not going to be bothered by it at all. One problem though is that it is not legal to remove such rocks, driftwood, sand etc. However I have been dismayed at times when such things follow me and even get in my car and refuse to get out when I tell them to. What else can I do??
  11. back up ideas ?

    Without power for 3 days,...nah media in the tanks will not be much help for the media. If possible daily water changes in each of the tanks and keep up the battery aeration. Feed the fish as little as possible and cover the tanks where possible. If the fish are in the dark, their respiration amd metabolism will be reduced. Fish are more hardy than we often give them credit for
  12. back up ideas ?

    The biological activity in cannisters will generally survive for about 2 hours without circulating water (that is, power). So it depends on how you are using the cannisters (what media are in the cannisters). If it is carbon etc I would just replace that after the power comes back on. If noodles and sponges etc, I would be tempted to dismantle the cannisters and put these biological media in the actual tanks which may help keep the biological activity alive. You can now easily buy starter media (Stability?) which will re-seed the canisters with biological activity. However you are likely to get another ammonia spike when everything starts up again. All the best with Yasi. With some attention your fish should not suffer from the power outage
  13. Fishchics Brisbane list

    Jodi-Lea sells extremely high quality fish and the way she packs them for shipment is legendary. Once the carrier lost a box of my fish for 5-6 days - I opened the box and the fish were "sitting there" looking at me as if asking when are we to be fed.
  14. I THINK I POISEND MY CICHLIDS

    I agree with everyone else - thorough washing and drying in the sun of anything non-living that is going into a tank. Water change and addition of carbon to the tank. Hands up whoever has not added something toxic to a tank sometime in their hobby life - I would put my hand up if I could find my car keys in my pockets...haha
  15. has my tank finished cycling?

    Josh, you are very much a novice in terms of bloopers I have made on discussion forums....hahaha